Healing From the Pain of Pet Loss

Healing From the Pain of Pet Loss

Farewell, Friend: A Gentle Guide to Saying Goodbye to Your Dog

The grief, loneliness, and regret of saying goodbye to a beloved dog or cat is surprisingly painful. You never “get over” the loss of a pet! You shared your home, heart and life with this animal – who gave you unconditional love, joy and trust. You’ll never forget, but you will feel better. 

It hurts to say goodbye. You’re not prepared, and you feel worse than you ever imagined. I’ve lost two dogs and four cats, and each goodbye was uniquely painful. But I learned how to soften the pain and heal the jagged bits of my soul. I’m here to help you.

Kitty Comfort Coping With Cat Loss

 

Life without your pet is a sad adjustment of heart and home. Whether your loss was planned or accidental, you’re grieving the end of a season of your life…and you’ll never be the same.

 

You’ll find companionship, hope, and healing here. You’ll hear from fellow animal lovers who know exactly how heartbreaking pet loss is…and you’ll be comforted with reassurances that your dog or cat is resting in peace.

Take heart, for you are not alone.

 

These comforting, encouraging guidebooks are pdf files that are easy to read on any device – and they’re only $2.99 US.

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Farewell, Friend: A Gentle Guide to Saying Goodbye to Your Dog

 

A gift for you: when you buy one of my pet loss ebooks, you get the other one at no charge. Simply send me an email and tell me which one you bought; I’ll send you the other one for free.

 

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Kitty Comforts: Help and Hope for Coping With the Loss of Your Cat

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It’s time to start healing and letting go. You’ll never forget your beloved dog or cat, but you will feel less alone. You won’t “get over it”, but you will feel less burdened by grief, guilt, or regret. Your heart will heal, your spirits will lift, and your soul will lighten.

When you order your copy, you’ll get my personal email address. You can contact me directly with questions or concerns. I also offer a money-back guarantee – so if you aren’t happy with your ebook, I’ll refund your money.

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Table of Contents

 

The three most important parts of recovering from pet loss are accepting, remembering, and healing. Each section of this ebook contains 5 chapters of fresh insights, suggestions, and activities. You’ll learn how to accept your loss, remember with less pain and more acceptance, and heal your heart.

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Part 1: Accepting Your Loss

  1. Reject the Myth That “Time Heals All Wounds”
  2. Understand Why Pet Loss Hurts So Much
  3. Explore Practical Ways to Cope With Regret
  4. Learn How to Deal With Guilty Feelings
  5. Surrender to Your Emotions – the Whole Catastrophe

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Part 2: Remembering Your Pet

  1. Honor Your Pet’s Memory
  2. Choose Your Companions Carefully
  3. Say Goodbye to Your Pet Without Falling to Pieces
  4. Create Peace and Comfort in Your Home
  5. Listen for the Roar of Something Greater

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Part 3: Healing Your Heart

  1. Learn How to Forgive Yourself
  2. Face Your Grief and Let Go of the Pain
  3. Pay Attention to Your Progress
  4. Rest in the Peace of a Healing Heart
  5. Find Out How the Story Ends

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Farewell, Friend: A Gentle Guide to Saying Goodbye to Your Dog

 

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Kitty Comforts: Help and Hope for Coping With the Loss of Your Cat

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About Me

Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen She Blossoms blogs

My name is Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen; I’m a writer with 25 years of teaching, social work, and counseling experience. I created the “She Blossoms” blog series in 2008 and have been earning a living as a blogger and writer since then.

As an experienced freelance writer, I’ve been published in magazines such as Woman’s Day, Reader’s Digest, Women’s Health, and More. My undergraduate degrees are in Psychology and Education, and I have a Master of Social Work (MSW) from the University of British Columbia. I also have a great deal of professional and personal experience with loss, letting go, and Blossoming!

Take good care of yourself, for you are worth taking good care of.

Blessings,
Laurie

 

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19 thoughts on “Healing From the Pain of Pet Loss”

  1. For 17 years, since she showed up on my doorstep at just 8 weeks old, Pfeiffer was my constant companion. At only 11 weeks old she had to spend 3 days at the vet’s: she became deathly ill due to a parasitical larva under the skin of her neck. But they saved her, and her purr was powerful when she saw me arrive to retrieve her and take her back home. Never did she cause any kind of trouble, and she wished nothing more than to be near me. The arm of my recliner, between my feet on the floor, snuggling up to my side in bed to have her tummy rubbed and fall asleep. If separated by a door, she would sit just outside and wait for me to emerge. When she became ill with either IBD or lymphoma at 16 years, she would even wait in the kitchen for me to administer her compounded liquid meds. Not so much as a fuss during the week or so I had to give her sub-cu fluids with her sitting on the kitchen counter. Twice she went downhill, then bounced back. Was it for love of me? Even on her last day, she just wanted to be with me. That was then. Now…. I begin crying anytime my attention isn’t wholly consumed by something else; I am constantly expecting to see her when I round a corner in the house; my entire routine at home was built around seeing to her needs first. I know I’m lucky to have had a year to prepare, but the reality is absolutely crushing. I have no more dreams for the future, no enthusiasm for anything I used to enjoy, no interest in being awake at all: I would rather the oblivion of a dreamless sleep. And I’m second-guessing every decision I made that brought her and I to that point when her life ended. I used to tell people I wanted to live forever, there was so much of the unknown in life to explore and learn; now I couldn’t care less. I’m just hoping the grief and debilitation will ease someday, while simultaneously fearing I will feel even more guilty when/if it does. This is nothing like the loss of family that I’ve endured before, it’s so much worse. I wish I could believe in an afterlife, but haven’t for a very long time. Judge me if you will, and believe it or not: I’m a GUY. My license plate frame says “Real Men Like Cats”. And I’m just trying to cope. To anyone reading who can identify with this: I cannot profess to believe in anything after passing, but please say a prayer for my sweet Pfeiffer. And thank you, Laurie.

    1. John, That just made me cry. You Pfeiffer sounds wonderful.
      My Simon disappeared one night after I came home from work. He talked to me as Siamese breeds do. I had him for 13 years. He was a crazy kitten and I swore I would never have another Siamese. As the years passed, Simon proved to have the most loyal personality. He would walk with me to my mom’s house. He would go check out noises and alert me if something wasn’t quite right in the house. He was a cuddle monster and loved all other animals. Even the neighborhood children would come over to play with Simon for the afternoon. I still hope for a day where he will come wandering up to the porch.
      After a few months, I went to volunteer at the SPCA. I was about to leave when I saw a tiny seal point kitten going into the display cage, fresh out of surgery. The kitten reminded me of my Simon. I immediately adopted the kitten. I tried a variety of names, but he answered to Puff. So, Puff it was. He was an ugly duckling. He grew into a gorgeous Birman cat. He must have been surrendered because he was not up to breed standard. He was so sweet. He loved cats, dogs, people. He was not once mean or aggressive. He was super lazy and loving. He quickly became my everything. He was so beautiful that I would tell him that he was the “Burt Reynolds of cats”. After taking a much needed vacation, I came home to find that my beautiful 2 year old baby had passed away and was under the guest bedroom. The person that was going by my house did not notice that he had been trapped in the room. I do not know exactly what day he passed, but I found him on August 31, 2018. I am shattered over it all. I do not even know how to forgive myself. I feel so guilty for being gone and having fun, while my baby was dying. I do not even know how to move forward from this. I feel robbed. 2 years was not long enough with him. A part of me died with him. I feel like a shell of myself.